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Can you use self-tanner while pregnant? In the following post, we will cover the topic talking about whether expectant mothers should use tanning beds or spray tan, and whether if it’s safe to tan during pregnancy.

Can You Use Self Tanner While Pregnant?

Can you use self-tanner while pregnant?

According to the health experts, you can safely use self-tanners when you’re pregnant since at-home self-tanners will not pose any harm to your little one. These tanners will not harm your baby because they are simply dyes that remain on the surface of the skin.

Fake tanners work due to a non-toxic active component called dihydroxyacetone, which may be found in creams, foams, lotions, and even water (DHA). A chemical reaction happens when DHA comes into touch with the skin’s outer layer, resulting in the desired browning or “tanning” appearance. DHA isn’t absorbed through the skin and can’t damage your baby since it doesn’t travel past the outer layer of skin.

Can you apply spray tan while expecting a baby?

Spray tan lovers will be disappointed to hear that inhaling some of the fine tanning mist hovering about your cubicle is quite easy. Because the effects of breathing in DHA and other tanning chemicals are unknown, some health professionals advise expecting mothers to avoid spray tans altogether, while others urge them to take additional measures like wearing a mask. Consult your doctor if you’re uncertain. Alternatively, you may save time and money by using at-home rub-on self-tanners.

Spray tans, on the other hand, should be avoided since the aerosol fumes may be harmful to your lungs if breathed. They may even go into your circulation, which means they might harm your unborn child.

Can you use fake tan mousse when pregnant?

Whether you’re pregnant or not, the basic guidelines for using fake tan are still the same. Nevertheless, you may need assistance while applying a self-tanner to your back, especially if your bump is very large!

When applying tanner to your legs and feet, you may want to perch on a bathroom stool if you can’t see your toes. Alternatively, just follow these simple steps for a successful self-tanning session.

  • 12-24 hours prior to using fake tan, exfoliate properly and remove any unwanted hair.
  • To avoid dry regions like knees, elbows, and wrists from absorbing too much color, use a little moisturizer.
  • Apply tanner to clean, dry skin in sweeping movements, and use a self-tanning mitt to cover your hands and guarantee an even application. Begin with your legs and work your way up.
  • Apply self-tan to difficult regions including the face, ears, feet, and hands using a kabuki brush.
  • Let the tan emerge as recommended, then rinse with water and pat dry gently.
  • Moisturize on a regular basis to keep your radiance!

Tanning beds and pregnancy

There are many risks for both you and your baby when it relates to tanning beds. Tanning beds produce ultraviolet (UV) radiation, which triggers skin cancer, in the same way, the sun does. Don’t trust anybody who tells you that tanning booths aren’t harmful to your health since they solely produce UVA rays.

According to one research, going to a tanning booth 10 times a year increases your risk of getting melanoma, one of the deadliest cancers. Melanoma is the only cancer that may travel to the placenta, which can be fatal for both you and your baby.

In addition, lying in a tanning bed may increase your body temperature to dangerous levels for your baby, especially during your first trimester. It’s been linked to spinal abnormalities in growing infants to have a high body temperature during pregnancy – that is, over 102 degrees F, which may happen in a tanning bed, hot tub, or sauna.

Then there’s the risk of restricting blood flow to your heart, and therefore to your baby if you lie on your back for too long. 

Finally, as an expectant mother, you may have more sensitive skin. This means you may be more prone to chloasma, those dark splotches that can appear on the face and occasionally the arms from time to time during pregnancy. 

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